Thursday, September 30, 2021

Confessions of a Police Captain – Filmart (Blu-ray/DVD Combo)

Theatrical Release Date: Italy, 1971
Director: Damiano Damiani
Writers: Damiano Damiani, Salvatore Laurani, Fulvio Gicca Palli
Cast: Franco Nero, Martin Balsam, Marilù Tolo, Claudio Gora, Luciano Catenacci, Giancarlo Prete, Arturo Dominici, Michele Gammino, Adolfo Lastretti, Nello Pazzafini

Release Date: May 3rd, 2019
Approximate Running Time: 105 Minutes 59 Seconds
Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1 Widescreen / 1080 Progressive / MPEG-4 AVC
Rating: FSK 16 (Germany)
Sound: DTS-HD Mono English, DTS-HD Mono Italian, DTS-HD Mono German
Subtitles: German
Region Coding: Region B/Region 2 PAL
Retail Price: EUR 25,00

"Commissioner Bonavia, an old-school policeman, has a very special life's work: he hunts down Ferdinando Lomunno, a local mafia boss who has a firm grip on the city through corruption, murder and terror. Despite the heavy burden of proof, he always manages to pull his head out of the noose. After an assassination attempt on Lomunno, the idealistic prosecutor Traini is commissioned with the case. With his naïve belief in what he believes to be the infallible justice of justice, he unintentionally crosses commissioner Bonavia's path. Together they should clarify the Lomunno matter once and for all. Both men, who could not be more different, find themselves within a few hours in personal conflict and a cauldron of violence and corruption, from which there is apparently no ray of hope." - synopsis provided by the distributor

Video: 4.25/5

Confessions of a Police Captain comes on a 50 GB dual layer Blu-ray.

Disc Size: 46.1 GB

Feature: 26.7 GB

Though no information is given about this transfer’s source, it’s in excellent shape. Colors and flesh tones look correct, image clarity and black levels look solid throughout and there are no issues with compression.

Audio: 4.25/5 (DTS-HD Mono English)

This release comes with three audio options, a DTS-HD mono mix in English, a DTS-HD mono mix in Italian and a DTS-HD mono mix in German. The English language track is in great shape, dialog comes through clearly, everything sounds balanced and ambient sounds/the score are well-represented. Included with this release are removable German subtitles for the Italian language track. It should-be noted though there are English subtitles, these subtitles are only for Italian text that ends the film.

Extras:

Extras for this release include, a trailer for Confessions of a Police Captain (4 minutes 56 seconds, Dolby Digital mono German, no subtitles), an image gallery (40 images – poster/lobby cards/Japanese press book), an interview with actor Franco Nero (4 minutes 16 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English with optional German subtitles), a reversible cover without FSK logo, a twelve-page booklet with an essay about the film written by Udo Rothenberg, and a partial filmography for Damiano Damiani (all text is in German) and the German version of Confessions of a Police Captain (95 minutes 49 seconds, 2.35:1 Widescreen / 1080 Progressive / MPEG-4 AVC, DTS-HD mono German, no subtitles). This release dedicates 16.5 GB’s to the German version.

Other extras include trailers for The Deadly Duo and The Strange Vice of Mrs. Wardh. Both of these trailers are in German and there are no subtitles.

Also, included with this release is a DVD that mirrors its Blu-ray counterpart.

This release is limited to 1000 copies.

Summary:

Though, Confessions of a Police Captain covers many of themes that have become synonymous with Poliziotteschi cinema. It’s a film that predates a film like Execution Squad, which would serve as a template for Poliziotteschi films.

At the heart of Confessions of a Police Captain is a morality tale that revolves around two characters, a jaded police commissioner named Giacomo Bonavia and a deputy district attorney named Traini, who’s yet too be jaded or corrupted by the system.

That said, the thing that makes Confessions of a Police Captain standout from other similar themed films is how it puts the focus on Bonavia and Traini, while other criminal activity that occurs takes a backseat.

Though Damiano Damiani worked in a variety of film genres. He was never a filmmaker who conformed to genre cliches. Throughout his filmography his films are marked by a want to dig into issues of the day by providing social commentary. And with Confessions of a Police Captain, the focal point is a broken system that never addresses the real problems.

As good as all the performances are all around. Ultimately, Confessions of a Police Captain’s heart and soul are its two leads dynamic performances, Franco Nero in the role of deputy district attorney Traini and Martin Balsam (Psycho, Two Evil Eyes) in the role of police commissioner named Giacomo Bonavia. The scenes they share are riveting and they have a tremendous amount of chemistry. And nowhere is this clearer, then their cat and mouse game where Bonavia always stays one step ahead of Traini.

Though there are no car chases or other more in your face Poliziotteschi elements. That’s not to say that Confessions of a Police Captain lacks the intensity that become a hallmark of Poliziotteschi cinema. From it’s opening moments right on through to it’s unforgettable finale, Confessions of a Police Captain is a film that rarely gives you a chance to catch your breath.

Confessions of a Police Captain makes its way to Blu-ray via a solid English friendly audio/video presentation, recommended.








Written by Michael Den Boer

Wednesday, September 29, 2021

Legend: Limited Edition – Arrow Video (Blu-ray)

Theatrical Release Date: USA/UK, 1985
Director: Ridley Scott
Writer: William Hjortsberg
Cast: Tom Cruise, Mia Sara, Tim Curry, David Bennent, Alice Playten, Billy Barty, Cork Hubbert, Peter O'Farrell, Kiran Shah, Annabelle Lanyon, Robert Picardo , Tina Martin

Release Date: October 12th, 2021
Approximate Running Times: 89 Minutes 29 Seconds (U.S. Theatrical Cut), 113 Minutes 27 Seconds (Director’s Cut)
Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1 Widescreen / 1080 Progressive / MPEG-4 AVC (Both Versions)
Rating: PG (U.S. Theatrical Cut), NR (Director’s Cut)
Sound: DTS-HD 5.1 English, DTS-HD Stereo English (Both Versions)
Subtitles: English SDH (Both Versions)
Region Coding: Region A
Retail Price: $49.95

"In an idyllic, sun-dappled forest, the pure-hearted Jack (Tom Cruise) takes his true love Princess Lili (Mia Sara) to see a pair of unicorns frolicking at the forest's edge. Little do they know, however, that the Lord of Darkness (Tim Curry, in a remarkable make-up designed by The Thing's Rob Bottin) has dispatched his minions to capture the unicorns and sever their horns so that he may plunge the world into everlasting night. After Lili and the unicorns are taken prisoner, Jack must team with a group of forest creatures and descend into Darkness' subterranean lair to face off against the devilish creature before it is too late." - synopsis provided by the distributor

Video: 4.5/5 (U.S. Theatrical Cut), 4/5 (Director’s Cut)

Here’s the information provided about the transfers, “The U.S. Theatrical Cut has been exclusively restored by Arrow Films for this release. The original 35mm camera negative (conformed to the International Cut of the film, which could not be included in this set due to territory-specific licensing restrictions) and additional interpositive film elements were scanned in 4K resolution at Company 3, Los Angeles. The scans were manually conformed to the U.S. Theatrical Cut by Arrow Films and graded and restored in 2Kat Silver Salt Restorations, London.”

“The Director’s Cut is presented in the 2011 HD master approved by director Ridley Scott. This master was also the primary grading reference for the restoration of the U.S. Theatrical Cut.”

Legend U.S. Theatrical Cut comes on a 50 GB dual layer Blu-ray.

Disc Size: 44.6 GB

Feature: 27.8 GB

Legend Director’s Cut comes on a 50 GB dual layer Blu-ray

Disc Size: 43.8 GB

Feature: 34.2 GB

The U.S. Theatrical Cut looks phenomenal. The source used is in immaculate shape. Image clarity, and black levels look solid, colors look vibrant and grain looks organic.

Though the Director’s Cut uses the same master used for Universal’s 2011 Blu-ray. The results are a transfer that holds up well despite its vintage.

Another strength of these transfers, they are encoded by Fidelity in Motion, a company who’ve established themselves as the premier encoding company. 

Audio: 4.75/5 (DTS-HD Stereo), 4.25/5 (DTS-HD 5.1)

Each version comes with two audio options, a DTS-HD 5.1 mix in English and a DTS-HD stereo mix in English. All the audio mixes are in excellent shape, dialog always comes through clearly, everything sounds balanced, ambient sounds and the score are well-represented. That said, the DTS-HD stereo mixes are this release's best audio mixes. Range wise, the DTS-HD stereo mixes offer a more satisfying experience sonically. Included with this release are removable English SDH subtitles for both versions.

Extras:

This release spreads the extras over two discs.

Extras on disc one (U.S. Theatrical Cut) include Is Your Love Strong Enough? music video by Bryan Ferry (5 minutes 23 seconds, LPCM stereo English, no subtitles), television version’s opening (1 minute 26 seconds, LPCM stereo English, no subtitles), a 2003 documentary where the director discusses his career, including Legend titled The Directors: Ridley Scott (58 minutes 33 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles), a featurette that compares the different versions of Legend titled Incarnations of a Legend (20 minutes 47 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles), a two-part featurette titled The Creatures of Legend, Part One: Inside the Illustrations (10 minutes 28 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles) and Part Two: Inside the Make-up Effects (16 minutes 15 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles), a two-part featurette titled The Music of Legend, Part One: Jerry Goldsmith (15 minutes 12 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles) and Part Two: Tangerine Dream (13 minutes 8 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles), a newly created retrospective documentary titled Remembering a Legend (30 minutes 45 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles), an option to listen to the isolated music and effects track, an option to listen to 2002 Reconstructed isolated score by Tangerine Dream and an audio commentary with Paul M. Sammon, author of Ridley Scott: The Making of His Movies.

Extras on disc two (Director’s Cut) include image galleries: production stills (75 images), continuity Polaroids (71 images) and poster & video art (27 images), U.S. theatrical trailer #1 (1 minute 24 seconds, LPCM stereo English, no subtitles), U.S. theatrical trailer #2 (1 minute 13 seconds, LPCM stereo English, no subtitles), International theatrical trailer (1 minute 52 seconds, LPCM stereo English, no subtitles), four U.S. TV spots (2 minutes 11 seconds, LPCM stereo English, no subtitles), screenplay drafts (First draft and shooting script), alternate footage (9 minutes, LPCM stereo English, no subtitles), storyboards: Intro/Three Goblins, Lili and the Unicorns, Mortal World Turned to Ice, Jack and the Fairies, Find the Mare, Lose the Alicorn, Jack’s Challenge, Meg Mucklebones and the Great Tree and Downfall of Darkness, two lost scenes: Four Goblins (10 minutes 35 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles) and The Fairy Dance (3 minutes 6 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles), original making of featurette from 1985 (9 minutes 44 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles), an archival documentary from 2002 titled Creating A Myth: Memories of Legend (51 minutes 3 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles) and an audio commentary with director Ridley Scott.

Other extras include reversible cover art, six double-sided postcard-sized lobby card reproductions, glossy full-color portraits of the cast photographed by Annie Leibovitz, large double-sided poster and an illustrated perfect-bound sixty-page booklet with cast & crew information, an essay titled Into The Heart of Darkness written by Nicholas Clement, an essay titled Legends of Darkness written by Kat Ellinger, an essay titled Designing Darkness written by Simon Ward, Production Notes, Making Legend written by William Hjortsberg, Charles de Lauzirika on the Director’s Cut, Ridley Scott on the 2011 Blu-ray Transfers and information about the restorations.

Summary:

The great thing about home video is how it gave a second life to films that did not originally find an audience. And though television has helped breathe life into films that have fallen through the cracks. Ultimately, without home video they’re many films that would have been lost forever. 

Another thing that home video has brought to the table is a chance for director’s to revisit films that was taken away from them and give them an opportunity to assemble a director’s cut. That said, no filmmaker more than Ridley Scott has embraced the director’s cut.

Though most director’s cuts are simply adding deleted scenes or extending scenes. Legend is a rare exception to the rule, since its different versions all feature elements that are exclusive to each version. Legend also has two scores, one for the U.S. theatrical cut, and another score for the international cut and the director’s cut.

Content wise, Legend is the type of film fantasy cinema dreams of. Its wondrous premise has all elements that are synonymous with fairy tales. The riveting narrative is a classic take on good versus evil in which Jack the protagonist goes on a journey looking for Lili, his true love who’s now under the spell of Darkness. Along the way, Jack encounters a world filled with fantastical elements.

Perhaps the most surprising aspect of Legend is its performances, especially its three leads, Tom Cruise (Risky Business) in the role of Jack, Mia Sara (Ferris Bueller's Day Off) in the role of Lili and Tim Curry (The Rocky Horror Picture Show) in the role of Darkness. Not too be overlooked are the secondary characters who are all superbly portrayed.

Though Ridley Scott’s more recent output has veered away from the fantasy elements that his first four films as a director are known for. The one constant that can-be found throughout his filmography is his ability to create visually arresting moments. And with Legend he creates a visual feast that’s arguably his most beautiful film.   

When discussing Legend it is hard not to overlook the differences between the three versions. And though there are elements exclusive to each version that make all three versions watchable. Ultimately, the element more than any other that separates the three versions is the scores. With Jerry Goldsmith’s score being the more disable of the two scores.

Legend is another spectacular release from Arrow Video who once again go all out when it comes to their limited editions. Both versions included as part of this release are given solid audio/video presentations and there’s a wealth of insightful extras, highly recommended.

                                            U.S. Theatrical Cut screenshots.








                                            Director’s Cut screenshots.








Written by Michael Den Boer

Tuesday, September 28, 2021

Execution Squad: Limited Collector's Edition – Colosseo-Film (Blu-ray/DVD Combo)

Theatrical Release Date: Italy, 1972
Director: Steno
Writers: Steno, Lucio De Caro
Cast: Enrico Maria Salerno, Mariangela Melato, Mario Adorf, Franco Fabrizi, Cyril Cusack, Laura Belli, Jürgen Drews

Release Date: March 25th, 2018
Approximate Running Time: 97 Minutes 45 Seconds
Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1 Widescreen / 1080 Progressive / MPEG-4 AVC
Rating: FSK 16 (Germany)
Sound: DTS-HD Mono Italian, DTS-HD Mono English, DTS-HD Mono German
Subtitles: German
Region Coding: Region Free/Region 0 PAL
Retail Price: 16,99 EUR

"Italy in the early seventies. These are rough times and rough contemporaries are doing their mischief on the streets of Rome. Often, criminals caught by the police are released due to a lack of evidence and skilled defense lawyers.

During a robbery, two crooks shoot innocent passers-by. Mario Bertone, chief inspector of the Roman murder department, is in the dark for the first time in search of the perpetrators. While the unwavering Bertone goes about his work, a mysterious group suddenly appears on the streets of Rome at night. Their goal is to execute the released criminals in a bestial way..." - synopsis provided by the distributor

Video: 3.25/5

Execution Squad comes on a 25 GB single layer Blu-ray.

Disc Size: 22.7 GB

Feature: 21.7 GB

There’s no information given about this releases transfer and the transfer looks like it’s been sourced from an existing master that at times looks dated. Colors and flesh tones fare well, black levels at times look grayish and there are some compression related issues during darker scenes. With that being said, the source used for this transfer looks clean and any source related damage is minor.

Audio: 4/5 (DTS-HD Mono Italian), 3.5/5 (DTS-HD Mono English)

This release comes with three audio options, a DTS-HD mono mix in English, a DTS-HD mono mix in Italian and a DTS-HD mono mix in German. The English and Italian audio mixes are in good shape, dialog comes through clearly and everything sounds balanced. Range wise the Italian language track sounds more robust than it’s English language counterpart and the English language track has some minor instances of background hiss. Included with this release are German subtitles for the Italian language track.

Extras:

Extras for this release is spread over three discs.

Extras on the Blu-ray disc include a trailer for the film (3 minutes 36 seconds, Dolby Digital mono Italian, no subtitles).

Extras o the two DVD’s includes a trailer for the film (3 minutes 28 seconds, Dolby Digital mono Italian, no subtitles), an interview with actor Jürgen Drews (55 minutes 36 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo German, no subtitles) and a featurette titled The Way We Were (67 minutes 51 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo German, no subtitles).

Other extras include a slipcover and a sixteen-page booklet with an essay about the film written by Thomas Hübner. The booklet is in German.

It’s a shame that none of the extra content is English language friendly.

Also, included with this release are two DVD’s and Execution Squad is on one of these DVD’s.

Summary:

Where most Italian genre films from the 1960’s, 1970’s and 1980’s were heavily inspired by popular American cinema. Poliziotteschi (Italian crime films) is one of the rare instances of Italian cinema drawing inspiration from what was going on in Italy at the time. And though, there’s no denying that elements from films like, Godfather, Dirty Harry and Death Wish found their way into Poliziotteschi cinema. These outside influences all but vanished once Italian filmmakers started to focus of rampant crime and political unrest that was going on in Italy at that time.

At the heart of Execution Squad is a bleak tale about society overrun by criminals and a system that’s tied law enforcement’s hands from doing their job. Besides lawlessness, police brutality is also front and center in Execution Squad. With a secret society of former law enforcement officers acting as judge and executioner for those who have evaded justice.

Content wise, Execution Squad has all the elements that have become synonymous with vigilante cinema. The plot revolves around a police commissioner who’s pass moment of anger towards a suspect has branded him a bad cop that mistreated suspects. With that being said, Execution Squad’s greatest strength of is how it’s narrative shows two sides of police commissioner Bertone. The first half of Execution Squad focuses on his frustration towards a system that prevents him from doing his job, while the second half sees him transform into the protector of those, he had previously shown disdain for.

Performance wise the cast are all very good in their respective roles, especially Enrico Maria Salerno (The Bird with the Crystal Plumage, No, the Case Is Happily Resolved) in the role of police commissioner Bertone. He delivers a multilayered performance that perfectly captures his characters state of mind.

Other notable performances include, Jürgen Drews in the role of Michele Settecamini, a cold-blooded theft who’s all to willing to kill to save his own skin, Laura Belli (Almost Human) in the role of Michele’s hostage and Mario Adorf (Caliber 9, The Italian Connection) playing against type in the role of District Attorney Ricciuti.

From a production standpoint, there’s no area where Execution Squad does not excel. The premise is superbly realized, the well-executed narrative does a great job maintaining tension and the finale provides a very satisfying conclusion.

Visually Execution Squad does not disappoint, there are two thrilling car chases and there’s an ample amount of carnage. Ultimately, Execution Squad is extraordinary film that fans of Poliziotteschi cinema should thoroughly enjoy.

Execution Squad makes its way to Blu-ray via a strong audio/video presentation that’s English language friendly.








Written by Michael Den Boer

Monday, September 27, 2021

Shallow Grave – Vinegar Syndrome (Blu-ray)

Theatrical Release Date: USA, 1984
Director: Richard Styles
Writer: George Edward Fernandez
Cast: Lisa Stahl, Tom Law, Carol Cadby, Donna Baltron, Just Kelly, Vincent Tumeo, Gregg Todd Davis, Kevin Quigley

Release Date: September 28th, 2021
Approximate Running Time: 89 Minutes 26 Seconds
Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1 Widescreen / 1080 Progressive / MPEG-4 AVC
Rating: NR
Sound: DTS-HD Mono English
Subtitles: English SDH
Region Coding: Region Free
Retail Price: $39.98

"Four college coeds are on their way to Florida for spring break. While passing through a small Georgia town, they unwittingly witness the murder of a woman. But when they discover that the assailant is the local sheriff, they’re forced on the run from a cunning and deranged sociopath who will stop at nothing to cover up his crime. After trapping the girls in town overnight, he devises a plan to permanently eliminate any potential witnesses and begins to terrorize and murder the girls one by one…" - synopsis provided by the distributor

Video: 4.25/5

Here’s the information provided about this release's transfer, "Newly scanned & restored in 2k from 35mm vault elements."

Shallow Grave comes on a 50 GB dual layer Blu-ray.

Disc Size: 30.6 GB

Feature: 24.8 GB

The source used for this transfer looks very good and any source related imperfections are minimal. Colors look correct, image clarity, and black levels look strong and there’s a healthy layer of grain.

Audio: 4/5

This release comes with one audio option, a DTS-HD mono mix in English and included with this release are removable English SDH subtitles. The audio sounds clean, clear and balanced. That said, range wise there are some limitations.

Extras:

Extras for this release include reversible cover art, an interview with writer/producer George Edward Fernandez titled A Visual Storyteller (13 minutes 30 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English with removable English subtitles), an interview with director Richard Styles titled Looking For Magic (14 minutes 42 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English with removable English subtitles), two audio commentary tracks, the first audio commentary is with Richard Styles, and the second audio commentary is with The Hysteria Continues! and an embossed slipcover limited to 5,000 units.

Summary:

A film like Shallow Grave is a good example of why you should not judge a book by its cover or in this case a film. Though Shallow Grave has a salacious promotional poster that hints at the nastiness that lies within. Anyone expecting a film that dives right into bloodletting might be disappointed, since most of the first half of Shallow Grave is a light-hearted spring break adventure. Fortunately, the latter-half of Shallow Grave takes a darker turn that’s relentless.

From a production standpoint, Shallow Grave is a well-made film that fully exploits its resources. The premise is perfectly executed, the narrative peaks, and valleys are well-executed and an emotional gut-punch finale puts an exclamation on the events that have unfolded. The acting ranges from adequate to very good. With few performances far exceeding expectations. And the kill sequences are not for the faint of heart. Ultimately, Shallow Grave is a bleak film that slasher film fans are sure to enjoy.

Shallow Grave makes its way to Blu-ray via a first-rate release from Vinegar Syndrome that comes with a strong audio/video presentation and a wealth of informative extras, recommended.








Written by Michael Den Boer

Friday, September 24, 2021

Blades – Vinegar Syndrome (Blu-ray)

Theatrical Release Date: USA, 1989
Director: Thomas R. Rondinella
Writers: John P. Finnegan, William R. Pace, Thomas R. Rondinella
Cast: Robert North, Jeremy Whelan, Victoria Scott, Holly Stevenson, William Towner

Release Date: September 28th, 2021
Approximate Running Time: 98 Minutes 26 Seconds
Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1 Widescreen / 1080 Progressive / MPEG-4 AVC
Rating: NR
Sound: DTS-HD Stereo English
Subtitles: English SDH
Region Coding: Region Free
Retail Price: $39.98

"The Tall Grass Country Club offers its members a luxury getaway, with all the best in sport and relaxation. But when a mangled body is discovered on the club’s prized golf course, right before a nationally televised tournament, panic ensues at the possibility of a killer on the loose, and even worse, that the death might cause some bad press. Enlisting the expertise of Roy, a has been golf pro, along with disgruntled pro-hopeful, Kelly, to unmask the culprit behind the carnage, the club’s hard nosed owner soon finds himself with even bigger problems when additional victims begin to turn up, and all signs point to the killer being an out of control, bloodthirsty lawn mower!" - synopsis provided by the distributor

Video: 4.5/5

Here’s the information provided about this release's transfer, "Newly scanned & restored in 2k from its 35mm original camera negative."

Blades comes on a 50 GB dual layer Blu-ray.

Disc Size: 31.9 GB

Feature: 27.3 GB

The source used for this transfer looks great. Colors are nicely saturated, image clarity and black levels look solid throughout and grain remains intact.

Audio: 4.5/5

This release comes with one audio option, a DTS-HD stereo mix in English and included with this release are removable English SDH subtitles. This audio mix sounds great, dialog always comes through clearly, everything sounds balanced, ambient sounds are well-represented and the score sounds robust. 

Extras:

Extras for this release include reversible cover art, a stills gallery with music from Blades playing in the background, a making-of documentary titled Fore Warning (21 minutes 32 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English with removable English subtitles), an audio commentary with director Thomas R. Rondinella, and writer William R. Pace and an embossed slipcover limited to 5,000 units.

Summary:

Though cinema has a long tradition of films referring to other films. Most of these references fall into two categories, films that are paying homage or films that satirize. Case in point Blades, a film that falls into the latter-category.

If Blades poster art does not give away what film it is directly satirizing. Its opening moments make it abundantly clear. Blades is a send up of Jaws. It takes many elements from Jaws and moves action from the sea to the land. Also, there are many instances where Blades takes moments from Jaws.

From a production standpoint, the premise is well-executed and the narrative does a job balancing humor, and mayhem inflicted by a killer lawn mower. The special effects exceed expectations and the murder set pieces are sufficiently gory. Also, the cast's enthusiastic performance is Blades greatest asset. Ultimately, Blades is a highly entertaining send up of Jaws that fans of parodies are sure to thoroughly enjoy.

Blades makes its way to Blu-ray via a first-rate release from Vinegar Syndrome that comes with a solid audio/video presentation and a pair of insightful extras, recommended.








Written by Michael Den Boer

Perfect Blue: Limited Edition Steelbook – Shout! Factory (Blu-ray/DVD Combo) Theatrical Release Date: Japan, 1997 Director: Satoshi Kon Writ...