Friday, September 30, 2022

The Bullet Train - Twilight Time (Blu-ray)

Theatrical Release Date: Japan, 1975
Director: Junya Sato
Writers: Junya Sato, Ryunosuke Ono
Cast: Sonny Chiba, Ken Takakura, Etsuko Shihomi, Eiji Go

Release Date: December 13th, 2016
Approximate running time: 152 Minutes 11 Seconds
Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1 Widescreen / 1080 Interlaced / MPEG-4 AVC
Rating: NR
Sound: DTS-HD Mono Japanese
Subtitles: English
Region Coding: Region A
Retail Price: OOP

"The basis for the 1994 American hit, Speed, The Bullet Train (Shinkansen Daibakuha, 1975) stars the wonderful Ken Takakura (The Yakuza) as a mad bomber who plants a device on a high-speed Japanese train, programmed to detonate if the train’s speed drops below 80 kilometers per hour. His design: to collect a multi-million-dollar ransom." - synopsis provided by the distributor

Video: 4.25/5

The Bullet Train comes on a 50 GB dual layer Blu-ray.

Disc Size: 42.7 GB

Feature: 37.9 GB

Though no information is provided about the source of this release's transfers, the source used for this transfer is in great shape, and when compared to previous home video releases, this transfer is superior in every way. with the biggest areas of improvement being color saturation and image clarity.

Audio: 4/5

This release comes with one audio option, a DTS-HD mono mix in Japanese, and included with this release are removable English subtitles. The audio is in great shape. Dialog is clear, balanced, and robust when it needs to be.

Extras:

The extras for this release include an option to view the Twilight Time catalog, an eight-page booklet with an essay about The Bullet Train written by Julie Kirgo, an interview with director Junya Sato titled Big Movie, Big Panic (24 minutes 40 seconds, DTS-HD stereo Japanese with removable English subtitles), and an option to listen to the Isolated Music & Effects track.

Summary:

Genre filmmaking was at its peak in the 1970s, and this was due in large part to the fact that directors had more control than they had ever had before or since. The big budget disaster films, The Poseidon Adventure and The Towering Inferno, were drawing big crowds around the world, so it would only be natural for the Japanese to want to make their own home-grown disaster films. Bullet Train was directed by Junya Sato, who also directed the excellent True Account of Ginza Tortures and the first Golgo 13 film.

Junya Sato’s directing throughout The Bullet Train is nearly flawless as he lets the performances tell the story instead of showing off with fancy camera angles. The only flaw is the special effects, which, for the most part, look acceptable despite a few shots that appear cheap. Junya Sato also co-wrote The Bullet Train screenplay with Ryunosuke Ono.

The intricate narrative is well written as each new obstacle is revealed to its fullest effect. The Bullet Train was cut by nearly forty minutes when released outside of Japan upon its original release, and for this release, we are blessed with the full-length version of the Bullet Train. The bulk of the missing scenes take place during three flashback sequences, which are important to the overall feel of The Bullet Train as they add more character depth and give the viewer more insight into why Okita puts his plan of terror into action.

The cast is filled with colorful characters, most of whom are sympathetic and likable. Ken Takakura's performance as Tetsuo Okita is mesmerizing as his character is on the verge of breaking down and losing everything. Sue Shihomi has a brief cameo as a telephone operator.

Sonny Chiba may not be the lead in The Bullet Train, but he plays one of the most important characters as the bullet train's lead conductor, Aoki. Virtually every moment that involves a scene with Sonny Chiba in The Bullet Train sees him sitting nervously behind the wheel of the train, and even though his character lacks mobility, Sonny Chiba is able to convey so much just in his facial expressions.

The police are by far and away the least sympathetic characters in The Bullet Train, as they go back on their promises time and again. They are often overzealous as they try to capture criminals, and in most instances, they kill the criminals before they can get any information from them. This type of inept police work also helps keep the narrative going, as now they have to find another way to find and disable the bomb.

Surprisingly, Okita and his two sidekicks are the three characters that are the easiest to identify and care about. Ultimately, The Bullet Train is a tense drama that will have you on the edge of your seat right up to its tragic conclusion.

The Bullet Train received a now OOP Blu-ray from Twilight Time that came with a strong audio/video presentation and an insightful interview, recommended.








Written by Michael Den Boer

The Police Story Trilogy: Limited Edition Box Set – Eureka Video (4k UHD)

Theatrical Release Dates: Hong Kong, 1985 (Police Story), Hong Kong, 1988 (Police Story 2), Hong Kong, 1992 (Police Story 3: Supercop)
Directors: Jackie Chan (Police Story, Police Story 2), Stanley Tong (Police Story 3: Supercop)
Cast: Jackie Chan, Maggie Cheung, Brigitte Lin, Kwok-Hung Lam, Bill Tung, Mars (Police Story), Jackie Chan, Maggie Cheung, Kwok-Hung Lam, Bill Tung, Mars (Police Story 2), Jackie Chan, Michelle Yeoh, Maggie Cheung, Kenneth Tsang, Wah Yuen, Bill Tung, Josephine Koo, Kelvin Wong, Philip Chan, Ken Lo, Lieh Lo (Police Story 3: Supercop)

Release Date: September 26th, 2022
Approximate Running Times: 100 Minutes 31 Seconds (Police Story), 121 Minutes 53 Seconds (Police Story 2), 96 Minutes 30 Seconds (Police Story 3: Supercop)
Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1 Widescreen / 2160 Progressive / HEVC / H.265 / Dolby Vision HDR10 (All Films)
Rating: 15 (UK)
Sound: LPCM Mono Cantonese, DTS-HD 5.1 Cantonese (Restored), LPCM Mono English (Classic Dub Track) (Police Story), LPCM Mono Cantonese, DTS-HD 5.1 Cantonese (Restored), DTS-HD 5.1 English (Restored) (Police Story 2), LPCM Mono Cantonese, LPCM Stereo Cantonese (Home Video Mix), Dolby Atmos Cantonese, LPCM Mono English (Police Story 3: Supercop)
Subtitles: English (All Films)
Region Coding: Region Free
Retail Price: £60.99 (UK)

Police Story: "considered by Jackie Chan himself to be his best film in terms of pure action, Police Story stars Chan as “super cop” Chan Ka-Kui, who goes up against a notorious crime lord in a series of escalating set-pieces that resulted in many of Jackie’s stunt team being hospitalised." - synopsis provided by the distributor

Police Story 2: "Demoted to traffic cop after the events of the first film, Chan Ka-Kui is reinstated to the detective unit when a deadly gang of explosive experts blow up a building and threaten to blow up more if their demands are not met." - synopsis provided by the distributor

Police Story 3: Supercop: "Action superstar Michelle Yeoh (Everything Everywhere All at Once) joins the series as Inspector Yang Chien-Hua, who teams up with Chan Ka-Kui to take down an international drug ring." - synopsis provided by the distributor

Video: 4.5/5 (Police Story), 4.25/5 (Police Story 2), 5/5 (Police Story 3: Supercop)

Here’s the information provided about the transfers, "4K (2160p) UHD Blu-ray presentations of all three films across 3 Ultra HD Blu-ray Discs in Dolby Vision (HDR10 compatible)."

Police Story comes on a 100 GB triple layer 4K UHD

Disc Size: 90.7 GB

Feature: 68.5 GB

Police Story 2 comes on a 100 GB triple layer 4K UHD

Disc Size: 91.5 GB

Feature: 67.4 GB

Eureka Video originally released Police Story and Police Story 2 on Blu-ray in 2018. That release had a color grade that was not well received by some. This new release carries over that same master with the same color grading. Also, when it comes to black levels for these two films, at times they can look milky. That said, color grading issues and black levels aside, both of these films look great, and they both benefit from Dolby Vision and HDR10.

Police Story 3: Supercop comes on a 100 GB triple layer 4K UHD

Disc Size: 90.7 GB

Feature: 66.6 GB

Police Story 3: Supercop was released on Blu-ray by Eureka Video at the same time they’re releasing it on 4K UHD. Their Blu-ray and 4K UHD releases share the same master. When compared to the other two films' transfers, the transfer for Police Story 3: Supercop is easily the best looking of the three. The source for this transfer is in excellent shape; color saturation, image clarity, contrast, and black levels are solid; and there do not appear to be any issues related to digital noise reduction.

A note about the screenshots in this review. Though screenshots do give an indication of how any film can look, it is not possible to make screenshots that accurately showcase how a film will look in Dolby Vision and/or HDR10. That said, in motion, all of these films look a lot better than they do in these screenshots.

Audio: 4.25/5 (LPCM Mono Cantonese - Police Story), 4/5 (DTS-HD 5.1 Cantonese, LPCM Mono English - Police Story), 4.25/5 (LPCM Mono Cantonese - Police Story), 4/5 (DTS-HD 5.1 Cantonese, DTS-HD 5.1 English - Police Story), 4.5/5 (LPCM Stereo Cantonese, Dolby Atmos Cantonese - Police Story 3: Supercop), 4.25/5 (LPCM Mono Cantonese, LPCM Mono English - Police Story 3: Supercop)

Police Story comes with three audio options, a DTS-HD 5.1 mix in Cantonese; a LPCM mono mix in Cantonese; and a LPCM mono mix in English. All of the audio mixes sound clean, clear, balanced throughout, and robust when they need to be. The best sounding audio mix was the LPCM mono mix in Cantonese. Included with this release are removable English subtitles.

Police Story 2 comes with three audio options, a DTS-HD 5.1 mix in Cantonese; a LPCM mono mix in Cantonese; and a DTS-HD 5.1 mix in English. All of the audio mixes sound clean, clear, balanced throughout, and robust when they need to be. The best sounding audio mix was the LPCM mono mix in Cantonese. Included with this release are removable English subtitles.

Police Story 3: Supercop comes with four audio options, a LPCM mono mix in Cantonese, a LPCM stereo mix in Cantonese, a Dolby Atmos mix in Cantonese, and a LPCM mono mix in English. Despite the fact that all audio tracks sound clean, clear, and balanced. The Cantonese stereo and Atmos tracks sound noticeably more robust than the mono Cantonese and English tracks. It should be noted that the Cantonese audio tracks feature some dialog in Mandarin. Included with this version are removable English subtitles for all the dialog in Cantonese and Mandarin.

Extras:

Extras for Police Story include 4K restoration trailer (3 minutes 13 seconds, Dolby Digital mono Cantonese, no subtitles), original export theatrical trailer (2 minutes 26 seconds, Dolby Digital mono English, no subtitles), original Hong Kong theatrical trailer (2 minutes 47 seconds, no subtitles), an archival interview with actor Jackie Chan (19 minutes 34 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles), Jackie Chan show promo (4 minutes 41 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles), alternate and extended scenes (13 minutes 48 seconds, Dolby Digital mono Cantonese with removable English subtitles), an audio commentary with Asian film experts Frank Djeng (NY Asian Film Festival) and F.J. DeSanto, an audio commentary with action cinema experts Mike Leeder and Arne Venema, and an export cut of Police Story titled Police Force (87 minutes 20 seconds, LPCM mono English “classic dub track”, LPCM mono Cantonese “alternate audio mix” with the Kevin Bassinson score” with removable English subtitles).

Extras for Police Story 2 include original export theatrical trailer (2 minutes 15 seconds, Dolby Digital mono English, no subtitles), original Hong Kong theatrical trailer (4 minutes 1 second, Dolby Digital mono Cantonese, no subtitles), outtakes (5 minutes 15 seconds, Dolby Digital mono Cantonese, music from the film playing in the background), an archival interview with stuntman/actor Benny Lai (15 minutes 41 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo Chinese with removable English subtitles), Jackie Chan episode of Son of the Incredibly Strange Film Show (41 minutes 8 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles), an audio commentary with Asian film experts Frank Djeng and F.J. DeSanto, an audio commentary with Mike Leeder and Arne Venema, Police Story 2 alternate export version (95 minutes 31 seconds, Dolby Digital mono English, Dolby Digital mono Cantonese with removable English subtitles), Police Story 2 the original Hong Kong theatrical version (105 minutes 44 seconds, Dolby Digital 5.1 English, Dolby Digital mono Cantonese with removable English subtitles), and an audio commentary with Miles Wood and Jude Poyer for Police Story 2 the original Hong Kong theatrical version.

Extras for Police Story 3: Supercop include Hong Kong theatrical trailer (3 minutes 2 seconds, Dolby Digital mono Cantonese with removable English subtitles), Japanese teaser trailer (43 seconds, Dolby Digital mono Japanese with removable English subtitles), UK export theatrical trailer (2 minutes 12 seconds, Dolby Digital mono English, no subtitles), US teaser trailer (1 minute 41 seconds, Dolby Digital mono English, no subtitles), US theatrical trailer (1 minute 40 seconds, Dolby Digital mono English, no subtitles), five US TV spots (2 minutes 51 seconds, Dolby Digital mono English, no subtitles), US video promo (1 minute 39 seconds, Dolby Digital mono English, no subtitles), outtakes (51 minutes 33 seconds, Dolby Digital mono, no dialog, music from the film playing in the background), an archival interview with actor Jackie Chan titled Flying High (19 minutes 23 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles), an archival interview with actress Michelle Yeoh titled Dancing with Death (23 minutes 14 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles), an archival interview with director Stanley Tong titled The Stuntmaster General (19 minutes 35 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles), an archival interview with actor Ken Lo titled The Fall Guy (21 minutes 47 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo Chinese with removable English subtitles), an archival interview with Stanley Tong from 2003 (17 minutes 18 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo Chinese with removable English subtitles), an archival interview with Stanley Tong from 2005 (31 minutes 9 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles), locations featurette titled Police Story Location Guide (11 minutes 21 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles), a featurette titled The Ultra Violent Jackie Chan Video Games (11 minutes 11 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles), an interview with stunt coordinator and action film historian John Kreng (22 minutes 35 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles), an audio commentary with Asian film experts Frank Djeng and F.J. DeSanto, an audio commentary with Mike Leeder and Arne Venema, and alternate US version titled Supercop (91 minutes 10 seconds, Dolby Digital 5.1 English, Dolby Digital mono Cantonese with removable English subtitles). 

Other extras include a limited-edition hard case and a perfect bound one hundred-page booklet (limited to 4,000 copies), cast & crew credits for each film, an essay titled The Changing Faces of Jackie Chan written by David West; an essay titled A Policeman’s Lot written by James Oliver; Police Story production/behind the scenes stills and artwork; an essay titled Back on the Beat written by James Oliver; Police Story 2 production stills and artwork; an essay titled The Chinese Connection written by James Oliver; Police Story 3 behind the scenes stills and artwork; and information about the transfer titled Notes on Viewing.

Summary:

Police Story: When Jackie Chan first emerged on the scene in the 1970’s, he was one of many martial arts actors who were groomed to fill the void left by Bruce Lee’s untimely death. In these early film appearances, though, there were glimpses of Jackie Chan’s potential. He would not find his own footing until the late 1970’s, when he was finally able to secure more control over his career.

Having said that, it would take a few years for Jackie Chan to cement his now-trademark persona. And by the mid-1980's, he would enter into what is arguably his most celebrated phase of his career. With films like Wheels on Meals, My Lucky Stars, and Police Story,

Looking back on Jackie Chan’s career, no film had a larger impact than Police Story did. It is a film that would become the foundation for what is now considered the blue print for the type of films that Jackie Chan has become synonymous with making.

From a production standpoint, there is not an area where this film does not deliver and then some. The well-executed narrative is perfectly placed. Another strength of this film is how well it balances comedy and its action set pieces.

Without a doubt, this film's greatest asset is Jackie Chan’s (Drunken Master) tour-de-force performance in the role of a police officer named Chan Ka Kui. Other notable performances include Maggie Cheung (As Tears Go By, The Heroic Trio) in the role of Chan Ka Kui’s girlfriend, May, and Yuen Chor (Bat Without Wings) in the role of a drug lord named Mr. Chu Tao.

Standout moments include the film’s opening sequence, where undercover police officers have staked out a shanty town where a drug deal is going down. Things quickly go awry when one of the criminals spots an undercover officer. And in the aftermath of what follows is a car chase down a hill that destroys most of the shanty town. This scene culminates with the Chan Ka Kui character chasing after and catching a bus that Mr. Chu Toa used as a getaway vehicle.

Other standout moments include a scene where Chan Ka Kui is given the challenge of protecting a witness who does not want his protection. So Chan Ka Kui convinces the witness to accept his protection by having another police officer pretend to be an intruder who wants to kill her. And the film’s finale is a very satisfying conclusion that features wall-to-wall action that takes place inside of a mall.

Police Story 2: It is inevitable that when there is a successful film, there will be sequels or clones that try to recreate the film. And with Police Story, three years after its release,

The premise of Police Story 2 retreads familiar elements from its predecessor and replaces the villains from Police Story with new nemeses. It should be noted that Mr. Chu Toa, the main villain from Police Story, makes a cameo in Police Story 2. This is just a mild distraction from this film’s actual villains.

From a production standpoint, Police Story 2 takes a bigger is better approach as each action set piece tries to outdo the next one. This film saves its most explosive moment for its finale. And the narrative once again does a very good job of balancing comedy and action set pieces.

The cast is all excellent in their roles, particularly Jackie Chan (Snake in the Eagle's Shadow) reprising the role of Chan Ka Kui. He delivers another scene-stealing performance that overshadows anyone who shares the screen with him.

Standout moments include the scene where Chan Ka Kui, who is about to go on a much-needed vacation with his girlfriend May, and he is enlisted by mall security to help evacuate a mall that has just received a bomb threat. Other standout moments include a scene where the villains capture Chan Ka Kui and one of the villains tortures him by throwing bang-snap fireworks at his face and shirtless chest.

Police Story 3: Supercop: Jackie Chan (Drunken Master) returns for a third time as Inspector Chan Ka Kui. And just like its predecessors, Police Story 3: Supercop is a wall-to-wall action extravaganza that's filled with spectacular stunts that showcase Jackie Chan’s prowess as one of Hong Kong cinema’s most fearless martial artists when it comes to dangerous stunts.

Despite the fact that Police Story 3: Supercop picks up where its predecessors left off in terms of content, the result is a film that is best described as a different breed. Most notably, the difference between Police Story 3: Supercop and its predecessors is that humor is not as prominent, and the addition of Michelle Yeoh (Yes, Madam!) in the role of inspector Yang Chien-Hua provides Jackie Chan with a female equivalent who more than holds her own.

Besides Jackie Chan and Michelle Yeoh, the rest of the cast is filled with performances that all exceed expectations. Notable cast members include Maggie Cheung (The Heroic Trio) in the role of May, Chan Ka Kui’s neglected girlfriend; Lieh Lo (King Boxer) in the role of a general who supplies various crime bosses with drugs; and Kenneth Tsang (The Killer) in the role of Chaibat, a crime boss who resembles a James Bond villain.

Though most sequels fail to live up to the first film in their series, The Police Story films are a rare exception where each film somehow betters its predecessor. With Police Story 3: Supercop standing tall as the best of the three Police Story films.

Some may be disappointed by the color grade for Police Story and Police Story 2, or how the J-Card is not the proper size, or how the reversible cover art that was advertised was not included. That said, the result is a fantastic release that presents Police Story 1-3 in their best home video presentations to date. Each film comes with alternate versions, and there's a wealth of informative extras, making this a must-have purchase if you're a fan of Jackie Chan. highly recommended.

                                                           4K UHD screenshots.







































Written by Michael Den Boer

Two Witches – Arrow Video (Blu-ray)

Theatrical Release Date: USA, 2021
Director: Pierre Tsigaridis
Writers: Kristina Klebe, Maxime Rancon, Pierre Tsigaridis
Cast: Rebekah Kennedy, Kristina Klebe, Tim Fox, Belle Adams, Dina Silva, Danielle Kennedy, Ian Michaels

Release Date: October 17th, 2022 (UK), October 18th, 2022 (USA)
Approximate Running Time: 98 Minutes 14 Seconds
Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1 Widescreen / 1080 Progressive / MPEG-4 AVC
Rating: 15 (UK), NR (USA)
Sound: DTS-HD 5.1 English, LPCM Stereo English
Subtitles: English SDH
Region Coding: Region A,B
Retail Price: £24.99 (UK), $39.95 (USA)

"Expectant young mother Sarah is convinced she has been given the evil eye from a mysterious blank-eyed old hag while she is dining with her bullish and insensitive partner Simon. When the couple go to visit his new-agey friends Dustin and Melissa, dark forces are unleashed after an ill-advised attempt at consulting a Ouija board to allay her fears. Meanwhile, tensions grow between grad school student Rachel and her new roommate Masha after a violent incident involving a man that the strange and impulsive young woman has brought home." - synopsis provided by the distributor

Video: 4.5/5

Here’s the information provided about this release's transfer, "The High-Definition master was provided by The Rancon Company."

Two Witches comes on a 50 GB dual layer Blu-ray.

Disc Size: 44.6 GB

Feature: 31.1 GB

The image looks crisp, the colors and flesh tones are correct, the black levels are strong, and there are no issues with compression.

Audio: 5/5 (DTS-HD 5.1 English), 4.5/5 (LPCM Stereo English)

This release comes with two audio options, a DTS-HD 5.1 mix in English and a LPCM stereo mix in English. Both the audio mixes sound clean, clear, balanced, and robust. That said, as great as the stereo track sounds, the 5.1 track is the stronger of the two tracks. Included with this release are removable English SDH subtitles.

Extras:

Extras for this release include an image gallery with music from the film playing in the background, a theatrical trailer (1 minute 32 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles), teaser trailer 1 (1 minute, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles), teaser trailer 2 (54 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles), a teaser trailer  titled Silent Night (1 minute 17 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles), a teaser trailer titled Masha and Grandma (1 minute, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles), Grimmfest 2021 Q&A with director Pierre Tsigaridis and producer Maxime Rancon (30 minutes 15 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles), test footage (1 minute 33 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles), an interview with Pierre Tsigaridis who discusses the inspiration behind the piano score for Two Witches titled The Piano Score (10 minutes 50 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles), an interview with composer Gioacchino Marincola titled The Original Score (10 minutes 44 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles), an interview with actress Marina Parodi titled The Boogeywoman (7 minutes 47 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles), an interview with actress and associate producer Dina Silva (15 minutes 54 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles), Behind the Movie Episode 1 (4 minutes 27 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles), Behind the Movie Episode 2 (8 minutes 10 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles), an audio commentary with Pierre Tsigaridis, an audio commentary with Maxime Rancon, reversible cover art, a slipcover (limited to the first pressing), a two sided poster (limited to the first pressing), and a twenty-four-page booklet (limited to the first pressing) with cast & crew information, an essay titled The Changing Faces of Womanhood in Pierre Tsigaridis’ Two Witches written by Anton Bitel, Director’s Statement, Producer’s Statement, and information about the transfer.

Summary:

Two Witches is a film that proudly wears its fluency. which includes films like Suspiria, Don't Look Now, and Rosemary’s Baby. There are many elements throughout Two Witches that can be linked to those aforementioned films. Especially when it comes to the appearance and sound of the Two Witches.

The narrative is two stories which come together in the finale. The first story revolves around an expectant mother named Sarah who's been targeted by a witch who wants her unborn child. The second story revolves around roommates, one of whom is a witch.

despite the fact that both stories are well-executed. The first story is the stronger of the two stories. The narrative does a great job of building unnerving tension by juxtapositioning Sarah’s pregnancy with her deteriorating state of mind, which becomes more unstable as the witch gains more control. Though the second story follows the foundation laid out in the first story, the result is something that checks all the right boxes but lacks the potency of the first story.

From a production standpoint, the premise is well-executed, the narrative does a good job of building tension, and there are an ample number of well-timed jump scares. Other strengths include striking cinematography that features some disturbing imagery and a fantastic score that perfectly reinforces the foreboding mood. Ultimately, Two Witches is a technically sound film that depends greatly on how well you connect with its characters.

Two Witches gets an excellent release from Arrow Films that comes with a solid audio/video presentation and an abundance of extras, recommended.








Written by Michael Den Boer

Shogun's Samurai The Yagyu Clan Conspiracy – Discotek Media (Blu-ray) Theatrical Release Date: Japan, 1978 Director: Kinji Fukasaku Writ...