Wednesday, January 19, 2022

Warriors Two and The Prodigal Son: Limited Edition Set – Eureka Video (Blu-ray)

Theatrical Release Dates: Hong Kong, 1978 (Warriors Two), Hong Kong, 1981 (The Prodigal Son)
Director: Sammo Kam-Bo Hung
Cast: Ka-Yan Leung, Ho Wang, Sammo Kam-Bo Hung, Chia-Yung Liu (Warriors Two), Biao Yuen, Ching-Ying Lam, Sammo Kam-Bo Hung, Frankie Chan (The Prodigal Son)

Release Date: January 24th, 2022
Approximate Running Times: 95 Minutes 38 Seconds (Warriors Two - Original Version), 90 Minutes 7 Seconds (Warriors Two - Export Version), 104 Minutes 40 Seconds (The Prodigal Son)
Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1 Widescreen / 1080 Progressive / MPEG-4 AVC (All Films)
Rating: 18 (UK)
Sound: LPCM Mono Cantonese, LPCM Mono English (Warriors Two - Original Version, The Prodigal Son), LPCM Mono English (Warriors Two - Export Version)
Subtitles: English (All Films)
Region Coding: Region B
Retail Price: £25.99 (UK)

"Two Hong Kong action classics from Sammo Hung, Warriors Two and Prodigal Son both depict a version of the real-life kung fu master Leung Jan, whose mastery of Wing Chun would make him a legend.

In Warriors Two, Sammo Hung and Casanova Wong play two students of master Jan (played here by Bryan “Beardy” Leung) who must use their skills to defend their town against an evil businessman and his gang of killers.

The Prodigal Son follows Leung Jan as a younger man (played by Yuen Biao). Lazy and spoilt, he believes himself to be a great kung fu master not realizing that his father has been bribing his opponents to intentionally lose. After being humbled in a real fight, Leung Jan decides to become a real Wing Chun master!" - synopsis provided by the distributor

Video: 4/5

Here’s the information provided about Warriors Two's transfer, "TWO VERSIONS OF THE FILM, BOTH FULLY RESTORED IN 2K."

Warriors Two comes on a 50 GB dual layer Blu-ray.

Disc Size: 45.9 GB

Feature: 27.8 GB (Warriors Two - Original Version), 14.9 GB (Warriors Two - Export Version)

Here’s the information provided about The Prodigal Son's transfer, "FULLY RESTORED IN 2K."

The Prodigal Son comes on a 50 GB dual layer Blu-ray.

Disc Size: 44.9 GB

Feature: 30.8 GB

The sources for both versions of Warriors Two and The Prodigal Son are in great shape. The source looks clean, free of any source-related imperfections. Color saturation is very good, the image looks crisp, and though black levels look good, there are moments where they could be stronger.

Audio: 4/5

Warriors Two, the original version, and The Prodigal Son each come with two audio options: a LPCM mono mix in Cantonese and a LPCM mono mix in English. Warriors Two, the export version comes with one audio option, a LPCM mono mix in English. All the audio mixes are in great shape. There are no issues with distortion or background hiss; the dialog comes through clearly and everything sounds balanced. Range-wise, all the action sequences sound robust. Warriors Two, the original version and The Prodigal Son, both come with two audio options: removable English for Cantonese audio tracks and a second removable English subtitle track for text in Cantonese and songs sung in Cantonese. Warriors Two, the export version comes with removable English subtitles for text in Cantonese.

Extras:

The extras for Warriors Two include a stills gallery (15 images), the original theatrical trailer (4 minutes, Dolby Digital mono Cantonese with removable English subtitles), the international trailer (3 minutes 29 seconds, Dolby Digital mono English, no subtitles), an archival making of Warriors Two featurette (47 minutes 31 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English and Chinese with non-removable English subtitles for Chinese), an audio commentary with Asian film expert Frank Djeng (NY Asian Film Festival) and martial artist/actor Robert "Bobby" Samuels for the original version, and an audio commentary with action cinema experts Mike Leeder and Arne Venema for the export version.

Extras for The Prodigal Son include an audio commentary with Frank Djeng and Robert “Bobby” Samuels for the original version and an audio commentary with Mike Leeder and Arne Venema.

Other extras include a limited-edition reversible poster, a limited-edition O-Card slipcase, and a limited-edition booklet with cast and crew information for Warriors Two and The Prodigal Son, archival imagery, an essay written by James Oliver, a reprint of Frank Djeng’s original liner notes for The Prodigal Son from the US laserdisc release, reprints of Warriors Two’s original sales notes and theatrical flyer, and information about the transfer titled Notes on Viewing.

Summary:

Warriors Two: Warriors Two was one of the first martial arts films to feature the Wing Chun style of Kung Fu. Also, Warriors Two has a pre-credits sequence that features a voiceover narration that gives an overview of the Wing Chun style of Kung Fu.

Though the premise revolves around the all-too familiar theme of revenge, That way, the narrative unfolds, ensuring that there’s never a dull moment. The finale provides a perfect coda to the events that preceded it.

Though the action set pieces are Warriors Two's heart and soul, the narrative is a very satisfying balance of action and humor. With the standout action set pieces being a lengthy training sequence and an explosive finale,

The cast members all give excellent performances in their respective roles, particularly Sammo Kam-Bo Hung in the role of Fei Chun, who is the focus of the majority of the comedy. And when it comes to fight sequences, he delivers and then some. Another performance of note is Ka-Yan Leung in the role of a martial arts master who reluctantly teaches the protagonist.

From its opening moments, it is clear that Warriors Two is a special film. And, despite the fact that Warriors Two contains many elements that were synonymous with martial arts cinema at the time, The result is an exhilarating film whose impact on martial arts cinema is undeniable.

The Prodigal Son: From the first time that I saw Biao Yuen, I was immediately impressed by his ability to effortlessly perform ridiculous acrobatic stunts. He would be given the perfect opportunity to showcase his martial arts skills in The Prodigal Son.

The Prodigal Son, like Warriors Two, features the Wing Chun style of Kung Fu. The narrative revolves around a protagonist whose martial arts prowess is due to his father's paying off his opponents. Then one day, he encounters a fighter who humiliates him, and from there he sets out to become a true master of the martial arts.

Content wise, The Prodigal Son has all the elements that are synonymous with classic martial arts cinema. Revenge plays a role in the story at hand, and a lengthy training sequence that features some well-placed humor where the protagonist is being taught a fighting style that resembles going to the bathroom. That said, the fight sequences are spectacular.

The main attraction of The Prodigal Son is Biao Yuen in the role of the protagonist. He delivers one of his most memorable performances and when it comes to the fight sequences, he’s second to none. Other notable performances include Ching-Ying Lam in the role of a Chinese opera performer with extraordinary martial arts skills and Sammo Kam-Bo Hung in the role of another martial arts master.  

From a production standpoint, there’s not an area where The Prodigal Son does not excel. The premise is well-executed, and the narrative is a good mix of action and humor. Another thing that sets The Prodigal Son apart from other martial arts movies is that all the main characters have flaws that make them human and add more depth to the story.

Warriors Two and The Prodigal Son are given a first-rate release from Eureka Video that comes with solid audio/video presentations and insightful extra content, highly recommended.


















Written by Michael Den Boer

Monday, January 17, 2022

Danger: Diabolik – Shout! Factory (Blu-ray)

Theatrical Release Date: Italy, 1968
Director: Mario Bava
Writers: Adriano Baracco, Mario Bava, Brian Degas, Tudor Gates
Cast: John Phillip Law, Marisa Mell, Michel Piccoli, Adolfo Celi

Release Date: May 19th, 2020
Approximate running time: 100 Minutes 20 Seconds
Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1 Widescreen / 1080 Progressive / MPEG-4 AVC
Rating: PG-13
Sound: DTS-HD Mono English
Subtitles: English SDH
Region Coding: Region A
Retail Price: $29.99

"The suave, psychedelic-era thief called Diabolik (John Phillip Law) can’t get enough of life’s good – or glittery – things. Not when there are currency shipments to steal from under the noses of snooty government officials and priceless jewels to lift from the boudoirs of the super-rich." - synopsis provided by the distributor

Video: 3.5/5

Danger: Diabolik comes on a 50 GB dual layer Blu-ray.

Disc Size: 34.3 GB

Feature: 28 GB

There’s no information given about the source of this transfer. It looks like this transfer comes from a dated source. Any print related debris is minimal, colors look very good, details generally look crisp, black levels fare well, there are no issues with compression, and though grain is present, there is an inconsistency in how the grain looks.

Audio: 4/5

This release comes with one audio option, a DTS-HD mono mix in English, and included with this release are removable English SDH subtitles. The audio fared better than the transfer; the source is in great shape, dialog comes through clearly, everything sounds balanced, and ambient sounds are well-presented.

Extras:

Extras for this release include a U.S. teaser (1 minute 5 seconds, Dolby Digital mono English, no subtitles), U.S. theatrical trailer (2 minutes 23 seconds, Dolby Digital mono English, no subtitles), The Beastie Boys music video Body Movin’ with optional audio commentary by Adam Yauch (6 minutes 38 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles), an archival featurette titled Danger: Diabolik – From Fumetti To Film (20 minutes 23 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English and Italian with non-removable English subtitles), an archival audio commentary with actor John Phillip Law and Tim Lucas, author of Mario Bava – All the Colors of the Dark and an audio commentary with film historians Nathaniel Thompson and Troy Howarth.

Summary:

Mario Bava is most remembered as a director of Gothic horror films, though he worked in just about every genre imaginable. Two things that have always been present in virtually every color film that he has directed are his ability to frame picturesque shots in his cinematography and his exquisite use of colors. Both of these assets would help him greatly when it came time to direct Danger: Diabolik, which was based on one of the longest running Fumetti’s Diaboliks that was created by two Milan sisters, Angela and Luciana Giustani.

Right off the bat, Danger: Diabolik is a direct contrast to what we normally recognize as a superhero, especially since he really is the villain of the piece, who at best could be considered an anti-hero. He is cold and calculated to the point that he will kill anyone who gets in his way. His girlfriend, Eva Kant, is not as sadistic as her personality relies more on her sexuality, which often gets her whatever she wants.

Mario Bava’s $400,000 budget for Danger: Diabolik would have the largest budget of his career, and the film benefits greatly from this. Many of Bava’s films suffer from a lack of budget, and even though he is very good at working wonders with a shoestring budget, they still don’t have the overall polish that Danger: Diabolik does. The optical effects used in this film now feel dated, but still, no one could manipulate a miniature or a matte painting like Mario Bava. The sets and costumes are deliriously over the top in their design, which adds to the comic book feel of the film.

Acting wise, Danger: Diabolik is blessed with strong leads and an equally strong supporting cast. John Philip Law has had a long and varied career as an actor, with 1968 being his most memorable year as he starred in Death Rides a Horse, Barbarella: Queen of the Galaxy, and Danger: Diabolik. His performance as Diabolik is as good as any I've seen from him, perfectly balancing his sinister side with his laid-back ladies man persona. Marisa Mell (Perversion Story, Gang War in Milan) has been known to steam up the screen in the various films that she has starred in, and as Eva Kant, she exudes sensuality with her sex kitten approach to the character.

No discussion of Danger: Diabolik is complete without the acknowledgment of Ennio Morricone’s contribution to the film via his masterful score. Just like he had done previously with Sergio Leone, he sets the mood and tone of the film with musical cues that are, in many cases, associated with certain characters. The music is playful most of the time, like in an early scene when the police officers are getting ready to transport the money.

There are many wonderful set pieces throughout Danger: Diabolik, with my favorite being the scene in which Diabolik and Eva make love on a rotating bed filled with money. Also, this version of Danger: Diabolik is a longer version that restores footage missing from the American release, most notably the scene where Diabolik and Eva make love in a bed filled with money. Visually Dangerous: Diabolik is a dazzling feast for the eyes that’s rich with texture as Mario Bava lays it on, layer after layer of eye candy. Ultimately, Danger Diabolik is Mario Bava’s greatest achievement as a director.

Shout! The factory once again charges premium prices for dated transfers. And most of the extra content has been carried over from Paramount’s 2005 DVD release. That said, despite this release’s shortcomings, there’s really no other way to see Danger: Diabolik if you don’t already own Paramount’s 2005 DVD release.








Written by Michael Den Boer

Sunday, January 16, 2022

Sleep: Limited Edition – Arrow Video (Blu-ray)

Theatrical Release Date: Germany, 2020
Director: Michael Venus
Writers: Thomas Friedrich, Michael Venus
Cast: Gro Swantje Kohlhof, Sandra Hüller, August Schmölzer, Marion Kracht, Agata Buzek, Max Hubacher, Martina Schöne-Radunski, Katharina Behrens, Andreas Anke

Release Date: January 24th, 2022 (UK), January 25th, 2022 (USA)
Approximate Running Time: 101 Minutes 12 Seconds
Aspect Ratio: 2.39:1 Widescreen / 1080 Progressive / MPEG-4 AVC
Rating: 18 (UK), NR (USA)
Sound: DTS-HD 5.1 German, LPCM Stereo German
Subtitles: English
Region Coding: Region A,B
Retail Price: £24.99 (UK) / $39.95 (USA)

"Tormented by recurring nightmares of a place she has never been, Marlene (Sandra Hüller, Requiem) cannot help but investigate when she discovers the place is real. Once there, she suffers a breakdown and is admitted to a psychiatric ward. Determined to discover what happened to her, Mona (Gro Swantje Kohlhof), her daughter, follows and finds herself in Stainbach, an idyllic village with a dark history. What is it that so tormented her mother, and the people of Stainbach? What is the source of the nightmares she suffers? And who is the mysterious Trude that lives in the forest?" - synopsis provided by the distributor

Video: 5/5

Here’s the information provided about this release's transfer, "The High Definition master was provided by Global Screen, GMBH."

Sleep comes on a 50 GB dual layer Blu-ray.

Disc Size: 45.9 GB

Feature: 26.1 GB

Image clarity, black levels, and compression look solid throughout.

Audio: 4.5/5 (DTS-HD 5.1 German), 4/5 (LPCM Stereo German)

This release comes with two audio options, a DTS-HD 5.1 mix in German and a LPCM stereo mix in German. Both audio mixes sound great; dialog comes through clearly, everything sounds balanced, and ambient sounds are well-represented. Also, the DTS-HD 5.1 mix sounds noticeably fuller than its stereo counterpart. Included with this release are removable English subtitles.

Extras:

Extras for this release include image galleries: promotional stills and posters (23 images), and behind the scenes (19 images), theatrical trailer (1 minute 39 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo German with removable English subtitles), an image gallery of sketches that appear in the film titled Marlene's Sketches (83 images), four deleted scenes:   An Invitation to Normality (53 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo German with non-removable English subtitles), Pest Control (58 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo), When Wolfram Rules the World (1 minute 56 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo German with non-removable English subtitles), and King Otto (55 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles), a behind the scenes featurette titled Making Dreams Come True (2 minutes 46 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo German with non-removable English subtitles), a compilation of film festival introductions created during lockdown by director Michael Venus and the cast of Sleep titled A Dream We Dream Together (16 minutes 7 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo German with removable English subtitles), a conversation with Michael Venus and actress Gro Swantje Kohlhof titled Talking in their Sleep (26 minutes 4 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English with removable English subtitles), an introduction with Michael Venus and Gro Swantje Kohlhof titled This is no Dream (2 minutes 17 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English with removable English subtitles), an interview with anthropologist, dream researcher, and filmmaker Louise S. Milne titled Dream & Folktale in Sleep (11 minutes 13 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English with removable English subtitles), a visual essay by film critic Anton Bitel titled Sleepwalking through National Trauma (22 minutes 13 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English with removable English subtitles), a visual essay by film scholar Alexandra Heller-Nicholas titled A Strange Dark Magic (16 minutes 38 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English with removable English subtitles), an audio commentary with film critic and historian Kim Newman and author Sean Hogan, reversible cover art, a slipcover (limited to first pressing), a double-sided fold-out poster and a forty-eight page booklet (limited to first pressing) with cast & crew information, an essay titled The Interpretations of Dreams: Freud, the Unconscious, and the Horror Hotel in Sleep written by Alison Peirse, an interview with director Michael Venus, a fairy tale tilted Frau Trude written by Brothers Grimm, a list of books about fairy tales titled Further Reading and information about the transfer.

Summary:

What is the significance of dreams? Are they a remembrance of a past event, or do they foreshadow fears related to an unknown future?

At the heart of Sleep is a tale about a young woman named Mona whose mother ends up in the hospital in a comatose state. From there, Mona retraces her mother's steps, which led to the event that caused her trauma. Her mother was staying at a hotel that holds all the answers to what happened to her, and it also holds the key to a trauma from her family's past.

From its opening moments, dreams play a large role in sleep. And though most of the narrative takes place in the walking world, The narrative does a superb job of blurring the line between reality and dreams.

The heart and soul of Sleep is Gro Swantje Kohlhof’s portrayal of Mona, the young woman whose need to uncover the truth behind her mother's trauma puts her in harm's way. She delivers a phenomenal performance that puts you in her character's state of mind. The rest of the cast is excellent, particularly August Schmölzer's portrayal of Otto, the patriarch of a family who owns the hotel where Mona's mother suffered trauma.

From a production standpoint, Sleep takes full advantage of its resources. The premise is well-executed, and the narrative does a great job of keeping you on the edge of your seat. Also, the hotel's location is overflowing with a foreboding atmosphere. Another area where Sleep excels is its exquisite visuals that are filled with symbolism. Ultimately, Sleep is a well-made film that fans of psychological thrillers should thoroughly enjoy.

Although Arrow Video is most known for its cult cinema releases, In recent years, they have been adding more modern films into the mix and giving them the fully loaded releases that have become synonymous with Arrow Video. That said, though, not everyone of these new films is going to leave a lasting impression. In the case of Sleep, it is a film that deserves to be seen by a wider audience who will hopefully appreciate it.

Sleep gets an exceptional release from Arrow Video that comes with a solid audio/video presentation and an abundance of insightful extra content. Highly recommended.








Written by Michael Den Boer

Saturday, January 15, 2022

Kill, Baby, Kill! – Arrow Video (Blu-ray/DVD Combo)

Theatrical Release Date: Italy, 1966
Director: Mario Bava
Writers: Mario Bava, Romano Migliorini, Roberto Natale
Cast: Giacomo Rossi-Stuart, Erika Blanc, Fabienne Dali, Piero Lulli, Luciano Catenacci, Micaela Esdra, Franca Dominici, Giuseppe Addobbati, Mirella Pamphili, Valerio Valeri, Giovanna Galletti

Release Date: September 11th, 2017
Approximate running times: 83 Minutes 27 Seconds
Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1 Widescreen / 1080 Progressive / MPEG-4 AVC
Rating: 15 (UK)
Sound: LPCM Mono Italian, LPCM Mono English
Subtitles: English, English SDH
Region Coding: Region Free/Region 2 NTSC (UK)
Retail Price: OOP (UK)

"In the early 20th century, pathologist Dr Paul Eswai (Giacomo Rossi-Stuart) is summoned to a remote Carpathian village to perform an autopsy on a woman who died under mysterious circumstances. With the locals convinced they are being haunted by the spirit of a young girl who died years ago, can the steadfastly rational doctor find a logical explanation to the strange goings-on... or will his rational beliefs be destroyed by the dark secret that lies within the crumbling walls of the ancient Villa Graps?" - synopsis provided by the distributor

Video: 4/5

The transfer for this release was sourced from the best available original element, an original 35mm internegative, which was scanned in 2K resolution at LSP Medien Kuhn und Albrecht GbR, Germany.

Kill, Baby, Kill! comes on a 50 GB dual layer Blu-ray.

Disc Size: 36.9 GB

Feature: 24.3 GB

Kill, Baby, Kill! is a film that’s never looked great on home video. That said, considering that the original negative appears to no longer exist, All things considered, this new transfer from Arrow Video looks remarkably good. Colors look very good (it should be noted that there are a few brief moments where colors fluctuate), image clarity and black levels look strong throughout. There are no issues with compression and the grain remains intact.

Audio: 4/5

This release comes with two audio options, a LPCM mono mix in English and a LPCM mono mix in Italian. Both audio mixes are in very good shape; the dialog always comes through clearly, everything sounds balanced and, range-wise, the ambient sounds are well-represented. This comes with two subtitle options: English SDH subtitles for the English language track and English subtitles for the Italian language track.

Extras:

Extras for this release include an image gallery (27 images–lobby cards/posters), International theatrical trailer (2 minutes 32 seconds, LPCM mono English, no subtitles), a vintage Kill, Baby, Kill! photo-comic, German opening credits (3 minutes 25 seconds, LPCM mono), an introduction with actress Erika Blanc (35 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo Italian with removable English subtitles), an archival interview with Erika Blanc titled Erika in Fear (11 minutes, Dolby Digital stereo Italian with removable English subtitles), an archival featurette with assistant director Lamberto Bava titled Kill, Bava, Kill! (25 minutes 3 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo Italian with non-removable English subtitles), video essay by critic Kat Ellinger titled The Devil’s Daughter (21 minutes 39 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles), an audio commentary with Tim Lucas, author of Mario Bava – All the Colors of the Dark, a short film titled Yellow (6 minutes 49 seconds, LPCM stereo), reversible cover art and a twenty-page booklet with cast & crew information, an essay titled The Legacy of Melissa Graps: Creepy Kids of Italian Horror Cinema written by Travis Crawford and information about the transfer.

Included with this release is a DVD that has the same content as the Blu-Ray included as part of this combo release.

Summary:

Though Mario Bava was a versatile filmmaker who worked in every film genre, He’s most remembered for his contributions to the Gothic horror and Giallo film genres. Most notably, films like Black Sunday, Black Sabbath, and Blood and Black Lace.

Content-wise, Kill, Baby, Kill! combines the two genres that Mario Bava most excelled in. The look of Kill, Baby, Kill! has all the trappings of Gothic horror cinema and Melissa the ghost child's depiction is at times reminiscent of black-gloved killers from Giallo cinema.

Kill, Baby, Kill! The film opens with a pre-credits sequence where a frightened woman runs frantically away from an unseen menace that’s stalking her. And the moment after the woman gets impaled by spikes on top of a gate, a child’s sinister laughter is heard. Without any dialog, this opening sequence does a superb job of foreshadowing what’s about to unfold.

The narrative revolves around a village that’s besieged by a ghost child who haunts those who it blames for its tragic death. And when the outside world tries to intervene, the superstitious villagers view them with suspicion. With the finale act providing a very satisfying twist that perfectly ties everything together,

Performance wise, the cast are very good in their respective roles, especially Valerio Valeri's creepy portrayal of Melissa, the ghost child. Notable cast members include Giacomo Rossi-Stuart (Knives of the Avenger, Weekend Murders) in the role of Dr. Paul Eswai and Erika Blanc (The Devil’s Nightmare, The Night Evelyn Came Out of the Grave) in the role of Monica Schuftan, a young woman who’s returned to the village for the first time in twenty years.

Mario Bava’s films are known for their exquisite cinematography. With Kill, Baby, Kill!, he once again delivers a film that’s overflowing with striking imagery that’s filled with symbolism. Other areas where the visuals excel include extraordinary use of color, languid camera movements of decaying landscapes, dense fog and howling winds that create a tremendous amount of atmosphere.

Throughout his career, most of Mario Bava’s films were made on miniscule budgets and tight schedules. What he was able to do with Kill, Baby, Kill! is astounding, especially when you factor in that he made the film in twelve days. That said, Kill, Baby, Kill! is a film that looks richer than its anemic budget.

Kill, Baby, Kill! gets a definitive release from Arrow Video that comes with a solid audio/video presentation and a wealth of insightful extras, highly recommended.








Written by Michael Den Boer

Thursday, January 13, 2022

Jack Frost 2: Revenge of The Mutant Killer Snowman (Abridged Version - Collector's Edition) – MVD Rewind Collection (Blu-ray)

Theatrical Release Date: USA, 2000
Director: Michael Cooney
Writer: Michael Cooney
Cast: Christopher Allport, Eileen Seeley, Chip Heller, Marsha Clark, Scott MacDonald, Ray Cooney, David Allen Brooks, Sean Patrick Murphy, Tai Bennett

Release Date: December 28th, 2021
Approximate running time: 93 Minutes 2 Seconds
Aspect Ratio: 1.78:1 Widescreen / 1080 Interlaced / MPEG-4 AVC
Rating: NR
Sound: LPCM Stereo English
Subtitles: English SDH, Spanish
Region Coding: Region Free
Retail Price: $29.95

"Jack Frost (Scott MacDonald), the chiller killer is back and he's mad as hell. An accidental lab experiment resurrected the evil snowman, but this time, the crystal killer can't be stopped by fire, bullets or even his worst enemy, chemical anti-freeze. With revenge on his mind, Jack sets out to finish off his nemesis, Sheriff Sam (Christopher Allport), who is vacationing on a Caribbean island. Sam's balmy paradise turns into a Winter Terrorland when Jack freezes the island and quickly ices everyone around him. No one can stop the chilling killing spree when Jack can travel as lethal liquid or fatal, frosty flakes. Just when you thawed it was safe to go back in the fridge!" - synopsis provided by the distributor

Video: 2.5/5

Jack Frost 2: Revenge of the Mutant Killer Snowman comes on a 50 GB dual layer Blu-ray.

Disc Size: 29.7 GB

Feature: 20.5 GB

Though the source used for this transfer looks clean, the interlaced source does not do this transfer any favors. That said, some of the darker sequences look noisy, and vertical lines can be seen throughout. The colors look very good, and the image generally looks crisp. Also, for some reason, the sequence that precedes the opening credits is shot in a different wider aspect ratio than the rest of the film.

Audio: 4/5

This release comes with one audio option, a LPCM stereo mix in English, and included with this release are two subtitle options, English SDH and Spanish. The audio is in great shape; the dialog comes through clearly, everything sounds balanced, and the sound effects are well-represented.

Extras:

Extras for this release include reversible cover art, a slipcover, collectible mini poster, a trailer for Jack Frost 2: Revenge of the Mutant Killer Snowman (1 minute 47 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles), music video spoof (1 minute 57 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles), Full Empire Promotions’ Dominic Mancini Interview with actor Scott MacDonald: Part 2 (30 minutes 56 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles), interview with director Michael Cooney (4 minutes 58 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles), an audio commentary with Michael Cooney and an audio commentary with Tony Piluso, Newt Wallen and Crystal Quin of ‘Hack the Movies’.

Other extras include trailers for Jack Frost, House on Sorority Row, The Dark, Thankskilling and Thankskilling 3.

Summary:

Jack Frost 2: Revenge of the Mutant Killer Snowman is a sequel in name only to Jack Frost. Though both films share characters, tone-wise, they are like night and day.

Where Was Jack Frost? was a solid horror film that effectively worked humor into the story at hand. Jack Frost 2: Revenge of The Mutant Killer Snowman’s use of humor feels forced and often falls flat. Also, when it comes to horror-related elements, Jack Frost 2: Revenge of the Mutant Killer Snowman pales in every way when compared to Jack Frost.

Jack Frost 2: Revenge of the Mutant Killer The Snowman's narrative picks up one year from where Jack Frost left off. And though it retains a Christmas theme, it takes place on a tropical island. Also, though the opening setup lays out how Jack Frost is brought back from his unmarked grave, To say the premise is absurd would be an understatement.

From a production standpoint, there are so many areas where Jack Frost 2: Revenge of the Mutant Killer Snowman comes up short. The killing sequences are lacking, the acting is atrocious, and the narrative is unable to build any momentum.

It should be noted that the version of Jack Frost 2: Revenge of the Mutant Killer Snowman released by MVD is an edited version. That said, though it is edited, it is unlikely that an uncut version of Jack Frost 2: Revenge of the Mutant Killer Snowman would fare any better, since this film is awful.

The MVD Rewind Collection gives Jack Frost 2: Revenge of the Mutant Killer Snowman a good audio/video presentation and an assortment of insightful extras.








Written by Michael Den Boer

Warriors Two and The Prodigal Son: Limited Edition Set – Eureka Video (Blu-ray) Theatrical Release Dates: Hong Kong, 1978 (Warriors Two), Ho...