Wednesday, June 29, 2022

Neurosis (Revenge in the House of Usher) – Redemption Films (Blu-ray)

Theatrical Release Date: France/Spain, 1985
Director: Jesus Franco
Writer: Jesus Franco
Cast: Howard Vernon, Antonio Mayans, Lina Romay, Fata Morgana, Ana Galán, Antonio Marín, Daniel White, José Llamas, Françoise Blanchard, Olivier Mathot

Release Date: July 7th, 2020
Approximate Running Time: 93 Minutes 17 Seconds
Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1 Widescreen / 1080 Progressive / MPEG-4 AVCC
Rating: NR
Sound: LPCM Mono English, Dolby Digital Mono French
Subtitles: English
Region Coding: Region A
Retail Price: $29.95

"In an audacious feat of cinematic bricolage, Jess Franco utilized footage from three decades of filming to craft a unique story that pays homage to the morbid poetry of Edgar Allan Poe, while indulging the director’s personal obsessions. Antonio Mayans stars as Harker (a nod to Bram Stoker’s Dracula), who visits the crumbling castle of his former mentor, Eric Usher (Howard Vernon), now on the brink of mental collapse. Just as the house opens its doors to reveal dreadful, erotic secrets in every corner, Usher delves into his own memories and shares the causes of his increasing madness." - synopsis provided by the distributor

Video: 3.25/5

Neurosis (Revenge in the House of Usher) comes on a 25 GB single dual Blu-ray.

Disc Size: 21.6 GB

Feature: 21.4 GB

No information was provided about this source for this transfer. The source used for this transfer is in good shape and any source-related damage is minimal. That said, colors at times look subdued, black levels fare well, and the image generally looks crisp. That said, Neurosis uses footage from three different films. With the footage newly shot for Neurosis being the best looking footage.

Audio: 3.25/5 (LPCM Mono English), 3.5/5 (Dolby Digital Mono French)

This release comes with two audio options, a LPCM mono mix in English and a Dolby Digital mono mix in French. Though the English language track has a background hiss, the dialog comes through clearly and everything sounds balanced. The French language track is in better shape. Range-wise, both mixes are limited. Included with this release are removable English subtitles for the French language track.

Extras:

Extras for this release include, an English language trailer for Neurosis (1 minute 27 seconds, Dolby Digital mono English, no subtitles) and an audio commentary with Tim Lucas, co-author of Obsession: The Films of Jess Franco.

Summary:

Very early on, when watching your first Jess Franco film, there comes a moment where you either become enthralled by what you’re watching or you shake your head in dismay. And when it comes to those who fall into the latter category, it is difficult to get them to understand what makes Jess Franco's cinema so addicting to watch.

To date, I have seen over half of Jess Franco’s two-hundred plus filmography. And though there have been a few films that I did not enjoy initially, I have come away from most of his films enamored by what I saw. That said, though I am a devotee of the cinema of Jess Franco, I am also willing to admit that his filmography has a few films that are hard to watch.

Throughout his career, Jess Franco was known to recycle footage and add new footage to existing footage in an existing film. A case in point is Neurosis, a film that consists of footage from three other Jess Franco films and newly shot footage. On paper, such a mish-mash of footage sounds like a mess. Fortunately, in the hands of Jess Franco, the result is one of his more experimental films that draws heavily from German Expressionism.

Content-wise, Neurosis is a melting pot of Jess Franco’s cinematic influences. Besides German Expressionism, other influences include Neurosis’ alternate title Revenge in The House of Usher and other elements from the film take inspiration from Edgar Allen Poe’s The Fall of the House of Usher and Gothic horror by the way of elements from Bram Stoker’s Dracula.

Without a doubt, Neurosis’ greatest asset is Howard Vernon’s (The Blood Rose) pitch-perfect portrayal of Eric Usher, an ailing doctor whose obsession with reviving his dead daughter has brought on his madness. It should also be noted that Neurosis recycles footage of Howard Vernon from The Awful Dr. Orlof.

From a production standpoint, Neurosis is an uneven film that does a very good job considering its limitations. Though the premise is well-executed, it’s difficult to overlook an inconsistent narrative that derails momentum. That said, the last act of Neurosis is Jess Franco at the top of his game.

Neurosis (Revenge in the House of Usher) makes its way to Blu-ray via a strong release from Redemption Films that comes with a serviceable audio/video presentation and an informative audio commentary.








Written by Michael Den Boer

Eugenie… the Story of Her Journey into Perversion: Limited Edition – Blue Underground (Blu-ray/DVD/CD Combo)

Theatrical Release Date: Spain/West Germany, 1970
Director: Jesus Franco
Writer: Harry Alan Towers
Cast: Maria Rohm, Marie Liljedahl, Jack Taylor, Christopher Lee, Paul Muller

Release Date: December 15th, 2015
Approximate Running Time: 86 Minutes 58 Seconds
Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1 Widescreen / 1080 Progressive / MPEG-4 AVCC
Rating: NR
Sound: DTS-HD Mono English
Subtitles: English SDH, French, Spanish
Region Coding: Region Free
Retail Price: OOP

"Marie Liljedahl (the luscious star of INGA) is Eugenie, an innocent young woman taken to an island paradise where she is initiated into a world of pleasure and pain controlled by the sinister Dolmance (the legendary Christopher Lee). But when she surrenders to her own forbidden fantasies, Eugenie becomes trapped in a frenzy of drugs, sadomasochism and murder. Can a frightened girl in the grip of carnal perversion find sanctuary in the orgies of the depraved?" - synopsis provided by the distributor

Video: 3.5/5

Here’s the information provided about this release's transfer, “Brand new 4K High Definition transfer from the original uncensored camera negative.”

Eugenie… the Story of Her Journey into Perversion comes on a 25 GB single layer Blu-ray.

Disc Size: 18 GB

Feature: 13.8 GB

For this release, a brand new 4K transfer was created. Just like Marquis de Sade’s Justine, this release has been given an extensive makeover, and though this is the best Eugenie... the Story of Her Journey into Perversion has looked to date on home video. Areas of greatest improvement include color saturation and black levels. That said, there is one area where this transfer comes up short, and that is its use of digital noise reduction.

Audio: 4.5/5

This release comes with one audio option, a DTS-HD mono mix in English. There are no issues with distortion or background noise; dialog comes through clearly; everything sounds balanced; and the score sounds appropriately robust. This release comes with three subtitle options: English SDH, French, and Spanish.

Extras:

Extras for this release include, a poster & stills gallery, a English trailer for the film (3 minutes 23 seconds, Dolby Digital mono English, no subtitles), a featurette titled Perversion Stories (17 minutes 30 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English and French with removable English subtitles) and an interview with author Stephen Thrower the author of Murderous Passions: The Delirious Cinema of Jesus Franco (18 minutes 7 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles), reversible cover art, a CD that contains the score for the film and a twenty two page book with cast & crew info, an essay titled Justine Among the Swingers: Jess Franco's Eugenie written by Stephen Thrower and information about the CD that contains the score.

Included with this release is a DVD that has the same content as the Blu-Ray included as part of this combo release.

Summary:

Over the course of three years, Jess Franco would collaborate with producer Harry Allen Towers on a total of nine films. With Eugenie... the Story of Her Journey into Perversion is their seventh collaboration and their second adaption of the literary works of the Marquise de Sade. And once again, the screenplay would be written by Harry Allan Towers under the pseudonym Peter Welbeck.

Whereas their previous Marquise de Sade adaptation, Justine, was an epic in scope, this one is a costume drama set in the 18th century. This time around, they would set the story at hand during the present and give it a more intimate setting. Fortunately, these changes greatly added to Jess Franco's vision and not a more sanitized version for the masses like its predecessor. That said, Eugenie... the Story of Her Journey into Perversion is clearly the superior of the two Jess Franco/Harry Allen Towers-De Sade adaptions.

The first thing that strikes you about Eugenie... the Story of Her Journey into Perversion in comparison to Marquis de Sade's Justine is how much more explicit of an adaptation it is. And nowhere is this more evident than in its graphic deception of sexuality and sadness. Eugenie: The Story of Her Journey into Perversion's key moment of depravity is a scene where Eugenie's will is finally broken by Madame Saint Ange and her stepbrother. Also, while watching Eugenie... the Story of Her Journey into Perversion, one can clearly see themes which would dominate Jess Franco's cinema from the 1970's and beyond.

From a production standpoint, Eugenie... the Story of Her Journey into Perversion is filled with gorgeous visuals and many moments that are filled with a tremendous amount of atmosphere. And when it comes to this film's two leading ladies, Jess Franco does not waste a moment to showcase their more than ample assets. One of the best moments in this regard is a scene where Madame Saint Ange helps Eugenie as she is taking a bath. Another strength of Eugenie... the Story of Her Journey into Perversion is that when it comes to pacing, it is never an issue as things are always moving forward.

From a casting perspective, Eugenie... the Story of Her Journey into Perversion features another strong ensemble cast and, more importantly, a more inspired choice in regards to the casting of Marie Liljedahl (Inga) in the role of the protagonist Eugenie. She delivers a captivating performance that finds just the right balance between naivety and decadent behavior. Another remarkable performance includes Maria Rohm (Venus in Furs) in the role of Madame Saint Ange. She is Eugenie's father's mistress. Other notable cast members include Paul Muller (Eugenie De Sade) as Eugenie's father, Jack Taylor (Succubus) as Madame Saint Ange's step brother, and Christopher Lee (Count Dracula) as Dolmance, who serves as a narrator for Eugenie's journey.

Eugenie... the Story of Her Journey into Perversion gets a first-rate release from Blue Underground that comes with a CD with the score and a trio of informative extras, recommended.

It should be noted that Blue Underground has rereleased Eugenie... the Story of Her Journey into Perversion on Blu-ray, and this new release drops the DVD and CD that were part of the limited edition release.








Written by Michael Den Boer

Tuesday, June 28, 2022

Marquis de Sade’s Justine: Limited Edition – Blue Underground (Blu-ray/DVD/CD Combo)

Theatrical Release Date: Italy/USA/West Germany/Liechtenstein, 1969
Director: Jesus Franco
Writer: Harry Alan Towers
Cast: Klaus Kinski, Romina Power, Maria Rohm, Rosemary Dexter, Akim Tamiroff, Mercedes McCambridge, Sylva Koscina, Howard Vernon, Jack Palance, Rosalba Neri

Release Date: December 15th, 2015
Approximate Running Time: 124 Minutes 10 Seconds
Aspect Ratio: 1.66:1 Widescreen / 1080 Progressive / MPEG-4 AVCC
Rating: NR
Sound: DTS-HD Mono English
Subtitles: English SDH, French, Spanish
Region Coding: Region Free
Retail Price: OOP

"An Erotic Masterpiece from the Tortured Pen of the Marquis De Sade Romina Power (18-year-old daughter of Tyrone Power) stars as Justine, a nubile young virgin cast out of a French orphanage and  thrust into a depraved world of prostitution, predatory lesbians, a fugitive murderess (Mercedes McCambridge), bondage, branding, and one supremely sadistic monk (an outrageous performance by Jack Palance). It’s a twisted tale of strange desires, perverse pleasures and the ultimate corruption of innocence as told by the Marquis de Sade." - synopsis provided by the distributor

Video: 4.5/5

Here’s the information provided about this release's transfer, “Brand new 4K High Definition transfer from the original uncensored camera negative.”

Marquis de Sade’s Justine comes on a 50 GB dual layer Blu-ray.

Disc Size: 32.3 GB

Feature: 27.3 GB

This 4K sourced transfer is in excellent shape. When compared to all previous home video releases of Marquis de Sade’s Justine transfer, there is a noticeable entombment when it comes to color saturation and image clarity. Also, many of Blue Underground’s Jess Franco/Harry Alan Towers films have issues with digital noise reduction. This is not an issue with this transfer.

Audio: 4.5/5

This release comes with one audio option, a DTS-HD mono mix in English. There are no issues with distortion or background noise; dialog comes through clearly; everything sounds balanced; and the score sounds appropriately robust. This release comes with three subtitle options: English SDH, French, and Spanish.

Extras:

Extras for this release include a poster & stills gallery, French theatricaltrailer (3 minutes 46 seconds, Dolby Digital mono French with removable English subtitles), a featurette titled The Perils and Pleasures of Justine (19 minutes 58 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English and French with removable English subtitles), an interview with author Stephen Thrower the author of Murderous Passions: The Delirious Cinema of Jesus Franco (17 minutes 32 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles), reversible cover art, a CD that contains Marquis de Sade’s Justine’s score, and a twenty page book with cast & crew info, an essay titled Bambi Meets the Monsters: Jess Franco's Justine written by Stephen Thrower and information about the CD that contains the score.  

Included with this release is a DVD that has the same content as the Blu-Ray included as part of this combo release.

Summary:

Though Marquis de Sade's Justine was Jesus Franco's first full-fledged adaptation of the Marquis de Sade's literary works. There are traces of De Sade which can be found in other Jess Franco films as far back as The Sadistic Baron Von Klaus. Also, though there was no denying the influence that De Sade had on Jess Franco as a filmmaker, it should be noted that the screenplay for Marquis de Sade’s Justine was written by producer Harry Alan Towers under the pseudonym Peter Welbeck. That being said, Jess Franco still manages to infuse his undeniable imprint on the final product.

Whenever someone attempts to adapt the Marquis de Sade, there are just going to be some things that are never going to translate well or moments that, due to their graphic nature, would fall victim to various forms of censorship. And though this adaptation does a good job of retaining the essence of the source, it is far from a faithful adaptation. One of its most glaring changes is the handling of a character named Derroches.

In terms of production, Marquis de Sade's Justine would provide Jess Franco with the largest canvas he has ever worked with as a filmmaker. the reported budget being one million pounds. Needless to say, he would take full advantage of this rare opportunity to make a period drama set in the 18th century. Also, when it comes to customs and set designs, Marquis de Sade’s Justine does a superb job of maintaining the intended look of this era. Another area in which Marquis de Sade's Justine outperforms expectations is its use of Barcelona locations, some of which are considered landmarks.

When it comes to moments of sadism, the Marquis of Sade's Justine actually holds up very well in this regard. The most satisfying moments in this regard involve perverted priests, whose only quest in life is to find absolute pleasure. Of course, this is a Jess Franco film, and nudity is something he has never shied away from. And there are a bevy of beauties who are in various stages of undress.

Perhaps the most surprising aspect of the Marquis of Sade's Justine is its incredible cast of who's who from European cult cinema. The Marquis de Sade is played by Klaus Kinski (The Great Silence), and though his role is only a cameo, he makes an impression. His presence is still felt throughout Marquis of Sade's Justine. Other recognizable faces include: Akim Tamiroff (Touch of Evil), Mercedes McCambridge (99 Women), Sylva Koscina (Hercules), Rosalba Neri (Top Sensation), Howard Vernon (The Diabolical Dr. Z) and the ever delirious Jack Palance (Companeros) in the role of a perverted priest named Antonin.

Unfortunately, the casting of Romina Power in the role of this film's protagonist, Justine, proves to be the thing that hurts this film the most. She gives an expressionless performance that never fully captures the other side of the story, where she starts to enjoy the pain being inflicted on her. Then there is Maria Rohm's (Venus in Furs) performance in the role of the other sister, Juliette. And once again, here is another character who is underused. which is a shame since she delivers a pitch-perfect portrayal of Juliette.

Marquis de Sade’s Justine gets an exceptional release from Blue Underground that comes with a solid audio/video presentation, a CD with the score, and a trio of informative extras, highly recommended.

It should be noted that Blue Underground has rereleased Marquis de Sade’s Justine on Blu-ray, and this new release drops the DVD and CD that were part of the limited edition release.









 Written by Michael Den Boer

Monday, June 27, 2022

Female Vampire – Redemption Films (Blu-ray)

Theatrical Release Date: Belgium/France, 1973
Director: Jesus Franco
Writers: Jesus Franco, Gérard Brisseau
Cast: Lina Romay, Jack Taylor, Alice Arno, Monica Swinn, Jesus Franco, Luis Barboo, Jean-Pierre Bouyxou, Raymond Hardy, Anna Watican

Release Date: October 16th, 2012
Approximate Running Times: 100 Minutes 56 Seconds (Female Vampire), 70 Minutes 57 Seconds (Erotikill)
Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1 Widescreen / 1080 Progressive / MPEG-4 AVCC (Both Versions)
Rating: NR
Sound: LPCM Mono English, LPCM Mono French (Female Vampire), LPCM Mono English (Erotikill)
Subtitles: English (Female Vampire)
Region Coding: Region Free
Retail Price: $29.95

"Countess Irina (Lina Romay) lives on the island of Madeira, Portugal, where she must drain the ''life force'' of men and women for her own survival. One of her lovers/victims is a poet (Jack Taylor) who believes the undead countess is meant for him." - synopsis provided by the distributor

Video: 3.5/5 (Female Vampire, Erotikill)

Here’s the information provided about this release's transfer, “Mastered in HD from the original film elements”

Female Vampire and Erotikill come on a 50 GB dual layer Blu-ray.

Disc Size: 43.4 GB

Feature: 22.4 GB (Female Vampire), 12.8 GB (Erotikill)

Though no restoration has been done in the form of removing print damage, the sources for the two versions are comparable; there is color and density fluctuation; black levels are adequate; and the image generally looks crisp. That said, these are very good transfers that fans of this film are sure to be extremely satisfied with.

Audio: 3.25/5 (LPCM Mono English), 3.5/5 (LPCM Mono French) 

Female Vampire comes with two audio options, a LPCM Mono mix in English and a LPCM Mono mix in French with English subtitles. Erotikill comes with one audio option, a LPCM Mono mix in English. Background noise is minimal, everything sounds balanced, and dialog always comes through clearly.

Extras:

Extras for this release include a theatrical trailer for Female Vampire (1 minute 17 seconds, LPCM mono French, no subtitles), an interview with director Jess Franco titled Destiny in Soft Focus: Jess Franco Remembers Female Vampire (13 minutes 37 seconds, LPCM stereo English with non-removable English subtitles), an interview with film critic and actor Jean-Pierre Bouyoux titled Words for Lina (12 minutes 39 seconds, LPCM stereo French with non-removable English subtitles), and an alternate horror version of Female Vampire titled Erotikill.

Other extras include trailers for Exorcism (Demoniac), The Rape of the Vampire, The Nude Vampire, and Requiem for a Vampire.

Summary:

Female Vampire was made during Jess Franco’s most productive year as a filmmaker, 1973. He would complete 12 films during the year. Besides Female Vampire, a few other notable films that he directed this year include Sinner: The Secret Diary of a Nymphomaniac, Countess Perverse, A Virgin Among the Living Dead, and The Other Side of the Mirror.

And like many of Jess Franco’s films from this era of his career, Female Vampire would have multiple versions of the film released, including a hardcore version. The two most well-known versions are a 100-minute version titled "Female Vampire" and a 70-minute standard horror version titled Erotikill.

The Female Vampire marks an important moment in the career of Jess Franco. It would be the first star vehicle for Lina Romay, his latest muse and longtime companion at the time. This collaboration would span four decades and over 100 films.

The cast features several recognizable faces who have worked with Jess Franco on numerous occasions, like Jack Taylor (Succubus, Count Dracula), Alice Arno (Tender and Perverse Emanuelle) and Monica Swinn (Barbed Wire Dolls). Other key Jess Franco collaborators in Female Vampire include co-screenwriter Gérard Brisseau, who worked on several films as Jess Franco’s cinematographer, most notably Diary of a Nymphomaniac, Countess Perverse, and Plaisir à trois. and composer Daniel White, whose scores have graced more Jess Franco films than any other composer (excluding Jess Franco himself).

Content-wise, Female Vampire would see Jess Franco return yet again to vampires and lesbians. The plot, like most Jess Franco films from the 1970’s and onward, is anemic. With the emphasis being more on the mood created via atmospheric visuals and the tour de force performance from his leading lady, Lina Romay, who gives what is arguably her greatest performance of her career.

To the uninitiated, when it comes to the cinema of Jess Franco, Pacing is sure to give some novices a fit, since this film takes its time to get where it wants to go. While those more familiar with Jess Franco's cinematic obsessions are sure to enjoy every moment of sublime bliss that unfolds onscreen.

Without a doubt, the most memorable moment is when Lina Romay’s character, Countess Irina Karlstein, takes her sexual frustrations on a wooden bed post. The use of such an object in a scene like this aforementioned moment is ripe for interpretation. unable to have a sexually fulfilling moment with the living. She is forced to find her pleasure in an object that is as cold and lifeless as she is. And let’s not overlook the irony that a bedpost also resembles a stake, the most commonly used object to kill a vampire.

Female Vampire gets a first-rate release from Redemption Films that comes with two versions of the film, a strong audio/video presentation, and a pair of insightful extras, recommended.















Written by Michael Den Boer

Night Has a Thousand Desires – Mondo Macabro (Blu-ray)

Theatrical Release Date: Spain, 1984
Director: Jesús Franco
Writer: Jesús Franco
Cast: Lina Romay, Daniel Katz, Carmen Carrión, Albino Graziani, José Llamas, Mari Carmen Nieto, Mauro Rivera, Jesús Franco

Release Date: December 13th, 2016
Approximate Running Time: 92 Minutes 14 Seconds
Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1 Widescreen / 1080 Progressive / MPEG-4 AVCC
Rating: NR
Sound: LPCM Mono Spanish
Subtitles: English
Region Coding: Region Free
Retail Price: $24.95

"In this surreal and sensuous mystery/noir, Lina Romay (The Female Vampire, Lorna the Exorcist) plays Irina, a partner in a male-female mind reading act. At night she experiences vivid and charged dreams which end in murder. It seems that the people whose minds she reads are being killed off one by one." - synopsis provided by the distributor

Video: 4.25/5

Here’s the information provided about this release's transfer, “Brand new HD transfer from original negative.”

Night Has a Thousand Desires comes on a 25 GB single layer Blu-ray.

Disc Size: 22.4 GB

Feature: 18 GB

The source used for this transfer is in great shape. Colors look vibrant, flesh tones look healthy, details look crisp, black levels are strong, and grain remains intact.

Audio: 4.25/5

This release comes with one audio option, a LPCM mono mix in Spanish, and included with this release are removable English subtitles. There are no issues with background noise or distortion; dialog comes through clearly and everything sounds balanced. The score for the film sounds robust, and ambient sounds are well represented.

Extras:

Extras for this release include a Mondo Macabro preview reel, a Eurotika! episode titled The Diabolical Mr. Franco (24 minutes 41 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English and French with non-removable English subtitles for French) and an interview with author Stephen Thrower (33 minutes 12 seconds, Dolby Digital stereo English, no subtitles).

Summary:

Throughout Jess Franco’s film career, which spanned seven decades. He not only worked in all of the major genres, he arguably invented a few genres along the way that are undeniably indebted to him. Another constant change throughout his career was the wide variety of producers that he worked with, and it is through these various collaborations that his work has been broken down into subsections. Night Has a Thousand Desires is part of a series of films that Jess Franco made in the 1980’s in Spain for Golden Films Internacional. Other films from this period of Jess Franco’s career that have gotten English-friendly releases include Mansion of the Living Dead, Macumba Sexual, The Sexual Story of O, and The Inconfessable Orgies of Emmanuelle.

The premise of Night Has a Thousand Desires is simple, and the narrative is actually pretty straight-forward. It is what comes after the initial set up where reality slowly starts to fade away in place of surrealism. And to keep things moving forward as Night Has a Thousand Desires gravitates away from reality, there are more grounded moments that occur in between these aforementioned moments of surrealism.

From a production standpoint, Night Has a Thousand Desires is yet another crystal-clear example of Franco's being able to create something out of virtually nothing. From a visual standpoint, Night Has a Thousand Desires does not disappoint, and in most regards, it far exceeds expectations. There are no thrown away moments, no matter what the camera is focused on. This extends to the female cast, who all look exquisite throughout. Also, Night Has a Thousand Desires' score reuses music from Female Vampire.

There is a satisfying mix of bloodletting and eroticism. When it comes to that latter, Night Has a Thousand Desires is far from being the most erotic film by Jess Franco. That being said, the more surprising aspect of Night Has a Thousand Desires is when it comes to moments of carnage. Night Has a Thousand Desires delivers moments that are arguably on par with Jess Franco’s best moments related to carnage.

In terms of performance, the entire cast more than holds its own in their respective roles. The standout performance comes from Lina Romay (Lorna, The Exorcist, Exorcism) in the role of Irina, a mind reader whose gift gets her in trouble and puts those around her in danger. Overall, Night Has a Thousand Desires is an extraordinary film that firmly deserves its place amongst Franco’s best films.

Night Has a Thousand Desires gets a first-rate release from Mondo Macabro that comes with a solid audio/video presentation and a pair of informative extras, highly recommended.








Written by Michael Den Boer

Shogun's Samurai The Yagyu Clan Conspiracy – Discotek Media (Blu-ray) Theatrical Release Date: Japan, 1978 Director: Kinji Fukasaku Writ...